Pediatric Extractions

Pediatric Extractions

pediatricextraction

Our pediatric dentists are trained in the removal of erupted primary (baby) teeth, as well as simple extractions of select permanent teeth (incisors, premolars).  A primary (baby) tooth may need to be extracted for a variety of reasons, including but not limited to:  large unrestorable caries, abscess formation, crowding issues, failure to exfoliate (fall out) on own.  Permanent teeth that need extraction due to abscess formation, or unrestorable caries are generally referred to a local oral surgeon for removal, however, certain permanent teeth (incisors, premolars) that require simple extraction for orthodontic purposes are removed in our office by our pediatric dentists.  The majority of simple primary teeth and permanent incisor and premolar extractions can be done with local anesthetic alone, or with local anesthetic and nitrous oxide analgesia.  Should your child require sedation or general anesthesia for extractions, we will refer you to either a local oral surgeon or to Boston Children’s Hospital.

Since our office specializes in pediatric dentistry, our staff will make your child’s visit as easy as can be.  Should an extraction be recommended for your child, we ask you limit your explanation of how an extraction is done.

Our staff has special vocabulary we use with children, as you may have already experienced at other visits.  In our office there are certain words we never say such as:

      •NOVOCAINE, SHOT or NEEDLE instead we say “sleepy drops” 
      •YANK or PULL instead we say “wiggle out”
      •BLOOD instead we say “red stuff”
      •HURT or PAIN instead we say “a different or funny feeling”

By limiting the discussion of your past experiences and avoiding the bold words above, we feel your child will have as pleasant an experience as possible.

Following your child’s extraction, our staff with review post operative care.  Below is a summary:

Care Instructions Following Tooth Extractions

  • Bleeding:  DO NOT USE STRAWS OR RINSE FOR 24 HOURS. Discolored saliva may be apparent for 12-24 hours. If active bleeding occurs, bite on a gauze pad for 20 minutes. Do not disturb the clot. If bleeding still persists please call the office.

  • Swelling:  Slight swelling may be expected to accompany the removal of teeth. If directed, apply ice to the area for 20 minutes of every hour for several hours for today only.

  • Oral Hygiene:  Resume normal brushing as soon as possible. After today, rinsing with warm salt water (1/2 teaspoon salt to 3 oz. warm water) is optional, but aids healing.

  • Diet:  Soft to normal diet as tolerated; encourage liquid intake.

  • Pain:  If necessary, ibuprofen (Advil®) or acetaminophen (Tylenol®) may be taken.